Marty Schwartz Quotes

Marty has scored enormous percentage gains in every year since he turned full time trader in 1979, but he has done so without ever losing more than 3 percent of his equity on a month-end to month-end basis. In the US Investing Championships held by Stanford University Professor Norm Zadeh, his performance was nothing short of astounding. In nine of the ten four-month championships he entered, he made more money than all the other traders combined. His average return in these nine contests was 210 percent – non annualized! In his single entry in a one-year contest, he scored a 781 percent return.  

“I turned from a loser to a winner when I was able to separate my ego needs from making money. When I was able to accept being wrong. Before that, admitting I was wrong was more upsetting than losing the money.” 
”When I became a winner I went from ‘I figured it out, therefore it can’t be wrong’ to ‘I figured it out, but if I’m wrong, I’m getting the hell out, because I want to save my money and go on to the next trade.”
”By living the philosophy that my winners are always in front of me, it is not so painful to take a loss. If I make a mistake, so what! “
”Before taking a position always know the amount you are willing to lose.”
”The most important thing is money management, money management, money management. Anybody who is successful will tell you the same thing.”
”I always take my losses quickly. That is probably the key to my success.”
”The best advice I can give to the ordinary guy trying to become a better trader is Learn to take losses. The most important thing in making money is not letting your losses get out of hand.

Jim Chanos On Short Selling: The Power of Negative Thinking

Short selling and Jim Chanos go hand in hand. Whenever you see his name, you instantly think of Enron and how he unveiled the fraud there. The Kynikos Associates hedge fund manager is worth following due to his success but maybe more-so for the fact that he makes so many public appearances. If hedge funds operate behind a shroud of secrecy, then short sellers typically operate behind a shroud ten times as secret. Yet Chanos deviates from the norm and can often be found on television, doing interviews, and sharing his ideas. While talking his book might help some of his positions, it also means he’s more often than not cast as a villain. Chanos argues that good short sellers are born, not trained. Many would take issue with that statement as numerous hedge funds recommend their analysts read Kathryn Staley’s book, The Art of Short Selling

to really gain an edge.

In late May, Chanos delivered a presentation at the CFA Institute’s annual conference. You’ll remember that Baupost Group’s Seth Klarman also spoke at this event and we previously covered his thoughts on the markets

as well. This time around we present you Chanos’ speech entitled, “The Power of Negative Thinking” which focused on his bread and butter: short selling. (more…)

The C=L U=M Principle

Most people like to stay within a range of relative comfort; a range that is self imposed. This is known as your comfort zone. For most of us, the grand majority of our experiences and daily life’s routines are within the limits of what we already know; the boundaries that we set, the fence that we build around us to feel safe.
We tend to ignore the outer limits of this circle of comfort almost all of the time. The unknown is a scary proposition for most. The CLUM principle simply states that COMFORTABLE = LESS OPPORTUNITY ANDUNCOMFORTABLE = MORE OPPORTUNITY; C=L U=M
The simple fact is: opportunity is in the areas that few are willing to venture. In the circle of humanity, you’re part of the circle. And, in order for you to take advantage of inefficiencies in the so-called system, you must go outside the system. You must, at some point, be a lone wolf. This requires you to be a little different than the “norm.” (more…)

Trading Thoughts

To truly become a proactive trader, you need to believe that your trade WILL go the direction you thought. This shows that you have belief in your system that finds your trade setups in the first place. If you put your trade on and the first thing you do is mark your stop or think “I hope this goes well”, then you are bound to fail as a trader. Successful traders do not hope. They do the research and use their system to find good candidates and enter the trades. It is at that point that they manage risk. They know exactly how much they have at risk and are perfectly fine if they lose that much. Why? Because it is baked into their system, and every trade does not go the way they thought. You need to be the same way in your trading.

You need to have the courage to fail, step off the curb, and enter the trade. Expect that the trade will go your way and use the power of positive thinking. Set your target, entry and your stop and then you know, at any point during the life of the trade, where you stand. If your target gets hit and you see the stock continue to go the same direction, you can’t get mad. You simply put the positive trade aside and evaluate it in a couple weeks to figure out why it continued to go beyond your target. It is at that point that perhaps you make an adjustment to your system. Perhaps you find out that it was a news item that caused the surge and then you know that it was atypical, rather than the norm, and no adjustment is needed.

In going through this thought process, you prepare yourself emotionally and as a result remove the chance of trading on emotion once in the trade. As an example, you need to be fully prepared to lose the amount invested in a single trade if your stop is triggered. If you aren’t fully prepared to take that risk, then you need to adjust the size of your trade or move on to another trade. If you prepare and emotionally accept the fact that you could be wrong, your trading becomes more mechanical and less emotional. Take some time to role-play the different scenarios and see what your reactions would be.

Defination of Great Trader

Great traders that we have had the pleasure to know and to be around, on exchange floors and on trade desks, had certain repeatable traits that all level traders can learn, or take something from;

  • Empathy and the ability to listen.
  • Faith in their own ability to get things done, if life and in work.
  • Humility, and a willingness to accept defeat as graciously as accepting success.
  • Desire to work towards, and not to just expect, having more success than defeat.

They listened more than they spoke. They had two ears and one mouth and had learned to use them in the right proportion. The ability to listen, either to a mentor, to your inner self, or to the market, is critical for success.

They had an undying faith and belief in their own ability, and accepted that most things that went wrong were probably outside of their control, because they planned their work. Their brutal honesty with themselves and with others allowed them to develop a faith in their own ability that was beyond the norm.

They were humble, and understood that they were not smarter, stronger, nor wiser than others; they just knew that there were few others that had more faith in their own ability to follow something through and to achieve their goals. (more…)

Small Things Matter

Ask many experienced traders to describe their most profitable trade, and you’ll hear a fantastic story. It’s usually purely chance. I know it was that way for me on a number of occasions. For example, the trader may have been going long on a large position when suddenly a report came out that shocked the market. Prices shot up as the public heard the news, and the trader made a killing. These stories are thrilling. They inspire you to sharpen your trading skills and master the markets. Who doesn’t want to be at the right place at the right time? But if you want to be a profitable, consistent trader, you can’t sit around waiting for a fantastic trading opportunity to present itself. Most of the time, trading is about making trade after trade to the point that it seems boringly routine. Rather than seek out big, exciting trades, it’s important to remember that small trades matter a lot.

As thrilling as big trades seem to be, it’s the smaller trades that keep you in business. It’s not unusual for traders to feel they have reached a plateau when trading. They make trade after trade and little seems to happen. They don’t suddenly find the Holy Grail of trading and achieve the great wealth and status they’ve dreamed about. Whether they realize it or not, however, they are still making progress. Each new observation of the market, each trade they execute, no matter how small, adds to their wealth of knowledge. They intuitively learn what to do and what not to do. They may see a slight variation in chart pattern that creates an inefficiency in price and learn just how far the pattern can deviate from the norm and still forecast the most likely movement of prices. On another day, they may learn a new way to place a protective stop so that they protect their risk, yet don’t get stopped out prematurely. These small everyday, seemingly insignificant experiences matter a lot.

Trading is challenging. Few survive trading over many years. The traders who do survive, however, know how to stay focused and patient. They don’t go for quick thrills, and unrealistically huge profit objectives. They know that losing is easy and can happen in the blink of an eye, but rebuilding capital usually takes a lot of work over a long period of time.

Instead of going for risky, exciting trades, you must seek out high probability setups, take steps to protect your capital, and execute your trades decisively, according to your trading plan. You may not have an exciting tale to brag about, but you take home steady profits–you get paid to trade. And when you make trade after trade, the small profits add up, and you end up with big profits in the end.

So when you feel that your earnings have reached a plateau, don’t get discouraged. As long as you are making profits, and staying in business, you’re continuing to develop your trading skills. You’re adding to your knowledge base. You’re developing a more intuitive feel for how the markets operate. It may not seem like you’re making the profits of a trading wizard, but if you keep at it, you’ll be one of the rare few that join the ranks of winning traders.
__________________

Trade what you see, not what you think!

Trading Thoughts

To truly become a proactive trader, you need to believe that your trade WILL go the direction you thought. This shows that you have belief in your system that finds your trade setups in the first place. If you put your trade on and the first thing you do is mark your stop or think “I hope this goes well”, then you are bound to fail as a trader. Successful traders do not hope. They do the research and use their system to find good candidates and enter the trades. It is at that point that they manage risk. They know exactly how much they have at risk and are perfectly fine if they lose that much. Why? Because it is baked into their system, and every trade does not go the way they thought.

You need to be the same way in your trading.You need to have the courage to fail, step off the curb, and enter the trade. Expect that the trade will go your way and use the power of positive thinking. Set your target, entry and your stop and then you know, at any point during the life of the trade, where you stand. If your target gets hit and you see the stock continue to go the same direction, you can’t get mad. You simply put the positive trade aside and evaluate it in a couple weeks to figure out why it continued to go beyond your target. It is at that point that perhaps you make an adjustment to your system. Perhaps you find out that it was a news item that caused the surge and then you know that it was atypical, rather than the norm, and no adjustment is needed.

In going through this thought process, you prepare yourself emotionally and as a result remove the chance of trading on emotion once in the trade. As an example, you need to be fully prepared to lose the amount invested in a single trade if your stop is triggered. If you aren’t fully prepared to take that risk, then you need to adjust the size of your trade or move on to another trade. If you prepare and emotionally accept the fact that you could be wrong, your trading becomes more mechanical and less emotional. Take some time to role-play the different scenarios and see what your reactions would be.

Erin Burnett yells at guy, saying he is 'so rude!'

To be honest, we’re not sure what EuroPacific’s Michael Pento did during this debate that was so out of the norm for CNBC, where yelling and talking over each other is common… but obviously he touched a nerve with Erin Burnett who yelled at him YOU ARE SO RUDE right at the :37 mark.
Then after he finishes he point, she lectures him some more, prompting the eye-roll seen here.
As for the debate? It was about the US bond market and whether the massive US debt load will turn bonds into toilet paper. We guarantee nobody makes a point you haven’t already heard several times.



 

Defining A Great Trader

Great traders that we have had the pleasure to know and to be around, on exchange floors and on trade desks, had certain repeatable traits that all level traders can learn, or take something from;

  • Empathy and the ability to listen.
  • Faith in their own ability to get things done, if life and in work.
  • Humility, and a willingness to accept defeat as graciously as accepting success.
  • Desire to work towards, and not to just expect, having more success than defeat.

They listened more than they spoke. They had two ears and one mouth and had learned to use them in the right proportion. The ability to listen, either to a mentor, to your inner self, or to the market, is critical for success.

They had an undying faith and belief in their own ability, and accepted that most things that went wrong were probably outside of their control, because they planned their work. Their brutal honesty with themselves and with others allowed them to develop a faith in their own ability that was beyond the norm.

They were humble, and understood that they were not smarter, stronger, nor wiser than others; they just knew that there were few others that had more faith in their own ability to follow something through and to achieve their goals. (more…)

An Investment Poem

The newfound opportunity arises softly at first

Like pearl shaped dew drops on a tea leaf

Quite unexpected but fast entranced and immersed

Her presence over the former solitude brings relief

More precious than any amount of money or power

More beautiful than the most stunning of jewels

You cannot appreciate the sweet without the sour

The kind of perfect pattern that makes investors drool

Finding shares to short are most difficult to borrow

But who would bet against an investment with so much potential?

Elation is now the norm starting yesterday, today and tomorrow

The biggest challenge lay in exercising prudential

Potentially an addicted lost cause am I

An investor who has witnessed too many ups and downs

Is it possible to stay grounded or is my destiny the sky?

Disciplined I promise to be, carefully soaking in the sights and sounds

Because true greatness only comes around every so often

Where your hands can’t help but shake and you feel it in your gut

The time is now, the place is here — this is Zen

As nature intended, this squirrel has found his nut

Go to top