Moody’s affirms USA credit rating at Aaa, outlook stable

Moody’s not interested in a lawsuit

Print all you like, spend all you like. No one is downgrading the USA after S&P did and the government sued them for $1.5B for mortgages. Even the company knew what it was all about.
At the same time, a country that prints its own money can’t default. But they can devalue.

Flood of Japanese money rushing to USD assets

Bloomberg report on Japanese investors, facing ongoing negative rates domestically, are buying dollars and risk assets

  • “The presence of the Japanese as the main carry trade driver seems to be growing as they must turn to overseas investments”
Demand for higher-yielding American assets growing
  • In April, Japan’s money managers bought the most U.S. corporate debt in eight years and the second-highest amount of equities in five years
  • “Japanese investors use yen to fund purchases of Treasuries or U.S. corporate bonds, for instance, to seek credit spreads and these flows are continuing,” said Koichi Sugisaki, a strategist at Morgan Stanley MUFG Securities Co. in Tokyo.
Check out USD/JPY … its net more or less unchanged, even a little lower, since November last year …. Without all the Japanese money leaving yen into USD it’d have to be lower I guess?
Bloomberg report on Japanese investors, facing ongoing negative rates domestically, are buying dollars and risk assets 

Bridgewater warns of a lost decade ahead for stocks

Bridgewater Associates is a Ray Dalio founded US investment firm. Via an analysts’ note:

Analysts at the firm are warning of a lost decade ahead for equity investors.
Citing:
  • U.S. corporate profit margins could reverse the strong growth seen in recent years.
  • these margins have provided a substantial portion of the excess return of equities over cash
  • reversal is more than merely the current cyclical downturn in earnings
  • “Globalization, perhaps the largest driver of developed world profitability over the past few decades, has already peaked”
  • “U.S.-China conflict and global pandemic are further accelerating moves by multinationals to reshore and duplicate supply chains, with a focus on reliability as opposed to just cost optimization.”
Also warn on rising corporate debt due to the efforts made on the coronavirus pandemic.

Fitch Revises India’s Outlook to Negative, Affirms IDR at ‘BBB-‘ Full Text

Fitch Ratings has revised the Outlook on India’s Long-Term Foreign-Currency Issuer Default Rating (IDR) to Negative from Stable and affirmed the rating at ‘BBB-‘.

 

KEY RATING DRIVERS

The revision of the Outlook to Negative on India’s Long-Term IDRs reflects the following key rating drivers:

The coronavirus pandemic has significantly weakened India’s growth outlook for this year and exposed the challenges associated with a high public-debt burden. Fitch expects economic activity to contract by 5% in the fiscal year ending March 2021 (FY21) from the strict lockdown measures imposed since 25 March 2020, before rebounding by 9.5% in FY22. The rebound will mainly be driven by a low-base effect. Our forecasts are subject to considerable risks due to the continued acceleration in the number of new COVID-19 cases as the lockdown is eased gradually. It remains to be seen whether India can return to sustained growth rates of 6% to 7% as we previously estimated, depending on the lasting impact of the pandemic, particularly in the financial sector.

The humanitarian and health needs have been pressing, but the government has shown expenditure restraint so far, due to the already high public-debt burden going into the crisis, with additional relief spending representing only about 1% of GDP by our estimates. Most elements of an announced package totalling 10% of GDP are non-fiscal in nature. Some further fiscal spending of up to 1 percentage point of GDP may still be announced in the next few months, which was indicated by a recent announcement of additional borrowing for FY21 of 2% of GDP, although we do not expect a steep rise in spending. Continue reading »

Jake Bernstein on Faulty Learning from Positive Reinforcement

  • The tension of riding a profit or loss may be quite intense for some investors. By liquidating too early, they are relieved of the tension, and, therefore, the mere termination of this situation will have the same result as a positive experience. They will be more likely to behave the same way in future trades.
  • Those who ride losses to unacceptably large amounts also tend to experience the positive effects of relief. Again the relief can serve to reward an otherwise inappropriate act. It’s like the man who, when asked why he kept banging his head against the wall, replied, “because it feels so good when I stop.”

Month-end rebalancing points to strong USD-selling – Citi

It’s almost June

It's almost June
Citi’s month-end rebalancing model flags a strong USD sell signal against EUR and GBP at this month-end
“Our Asset Rebalancing Model notes a rotation from equities into bonds at May month end. The signal is moderately strong coming in at -1.4/+1.3 historical standard deviations (hist. std. dev.) for equities and bonds respectively.
The FX impact notes selling of USD against EUR and GBP at month end,” Citi notes.
Typically, month-end FX re-balancing flows is felt most going into the 4pm London fix on the last trading day of the month.

George Soros: Coronavirus damage to Eurozone economy will last longer than most people think

Some remarks on the euro area by Soros

Soros

  • The survival of the EU is being challenged
  • This is not a theoretical possibility; it may be a tragic reality
  • EU needs to consider perpetual bonds, otherwise it may not survive
  • Says that he is particularly concerned about Italy
  • Says that Italy has been treated badly by the EU and Germany
Soros has been floating the idea of perpetual bonds since the beginning of the crisis but his idea does have its own validity since

Today’s 20-year Treasury auction will be the first since 1986

Interesting day in the bond market

The Treasury will jump into 20-year sales today for the first time in 34 years.
The initial auction of $20 billion is a relatively large one and is a reminder of how much debt the US is piling on. The notes are trading at 1.230%-1.220% on the bid/ask in the when-issued market. That puts them much closer to 30-year bonds (1.44%) than 10-years (0.71%).
“An auction concession of some sort is warranted; although we anticipate the new issue will be well absorbed even if it comes at a modest discount,” writes Ian Lyngen, head of US rates strategy at BMO.
The broader bond market is reluctant to send and clear signals at the moment. 10s have been in a tight range for six weeks now and it’s tough to envision a clear break on either side because you have inflation keeping yields up and the Fed keeping them down.
Interesting day in the bond market

Put Trading First, Be There Day In and Day Out

  • Consistency is your willingness to put trading first in your life so you’re online day in and day out, trading your system to maximize the odds that it will work for you when the market is moving.
  • When traders take a break for whatever reason — because they want to play, because they have experienced a series of losses, because of complications in their personal lives, or because the market is dead — they end up missing moves that could have resulted in hefty profits.
  • That doesn’t mean you always have to trade, but you should always be there to follow the markets.
  • It’s very easy once you’re self-employed and trading to excuse yourself for all kinds of reasons. This can prove to be a devastating mistake. You will find over time that those days you take off to play golf or go fishing or whatever will inevitably be the days when the two or three trades you’ve been waiting for are triggered. These trades would have made your month very profitable. Then you have to scramble for the rest of the month. When you trade this way, you tend to lose money. Inconsistency does not pay off.

Bank of England looking more urgently at negative rates

The Bank of England is looking more urgently at options such as negative interest rates and buying riskier assets to prop up the country’s economy as it slides into a deep coronavirus slump, the BoE’s chief economist was quoted as saying.

The Telegraph newspaper said the economist, Andy Haldane, refused to rule out the possibility of taking interest rates below zero and buying lower-quality financial assets under the central bank’s bond-buying programme.

“The economy is weaker than a year ago and we are now at the effective lower bound, so in that sense it’s something we’ll need to look at – are looking at – with somewhat greater immediacy,” he said in an interview. “How could we not be?”

Top BoE officials have previously expressed objections to taking rates below zero – as the central banks of the euro zone and Japan have done – because it might hinder the ability of banks in Britain to lend and hurt rather than help the economy.

But with the BoE’s benchmark at an all-time low of 0.1% and Britain facing potentially its sharpest economic downturn in 300 years, talk of cutting rates to below zero has resurfaced.

Governor Andrew Bailey said on Thursday the BoE was not contemplating negative rates, but he declined to rule it out altogether.