The week ahead is a big one on the US economic calendar

What’s coming up in the week ahead

The final week of the month is always a busy one. Here’s what’s coming up in the week ahead.
Monday:
  • Chicago Fed national activity
  • Durable goods orders
  • Dallas Fed
Tuesday:
  • FHFA house price index
  • Case Shiller house price index
  • Richmond Fed
  • Conference Board consumer confidence
Wednesday:
  • Weekly oil inventories
  • Fed’s Barkin and Daly
Thursday:
  • Second look at Q2 US GDP
  • Advance goods trade balance
  • Wholesale inventories
  • Weekly jobless claims
  • Pending home sales
Friday:
  • PCE report
  • U Mich final consumer sentiment
  • Chicago PMI

Ifo economist says that German economy faces a turbulent time ahead

Comments by Ifo economist, Klaus Wohlrabe, following the data earlier

Germany
  • Sees a slightly positive growth rate in 2H 2019 for Germany
  • But notes that recession is spreading in all important sectors in German economy
  • Says risk of disorderly Brexit has increased
  • Doesn’t believe that the ECB will loosen policy today
The early signs for Q3 haven’t been encouraging for Germany with the manufacturing sector in freefall as the recession in that area deepens. As that continues, the risk of spillover to the services sector will intensify and that won’t bode well for the economic outlook.
As for his comment on the ECB, I’m also leaning more towards that as the governing council may likely see fit to only change its forward guidance as they will only release their latest staff projections in September. That said, they will be skating on very, very thin ice in the mean time in managing the euro and inflation expectations.

Trading Errors

 Ignoring the downside of a trade. Most traders, when entering a trade, look only at the money they think they will make by taking the trade. They rarely consider that the trade may go against them and that they could lose. The reality is that whenever someone buys a futures contract, someone else is selling that same futures contract. The buyer is convinced that the market will go up. The seller is convinced that the market has finished going up. If you look at your trades that way, you will become a more conservative and realistic trader.

Taking too much risk. With all the warnings about risk contained in the forms with which you open your account, and with all the required warnings in books, magazines, and many other forms of literature you receive as a trader, why is it so hard to believe that trading carries with it a tremendous amount of risk? It’s as though you know on an intellectual basis that trading futures is risky, but you don’t really take it to heart and live it until you find yourself caught up in the sheer terror of a major losing trade. Greed drives traders to accept too much risk. They get into too many trades. They put their stop too far away. They trade with too little capital. We’re not advising you to avoid trading futures. What we’re saying is that you should embark on a sound, disciplined trading plan based on knowledge of the futures markets in which you trade, coupled with good common sense.

World’s Oldest Trader

World’s oldest Value Investor. Duly noted (hat tip to Mr. Melvin) that Irving Kahn is a former Ben Graham assistant and likes to buy and hold for long time– and not really a “trader” per se.

From the WSJ:


Discipline has been a key for Mr. Kahn. He still works five days a week, slacking off only on the occasional Friday. He reads voraciously, including at least two newspapers every day and numerous magazines and books, especially about science. His abiding goal, he told me, is “to know much more about the stock I’m buying than the man who’s selling does.” What has enabled him to live so long? “No secret,” he said. “Just nature’s way.” He added, speaking of unwholesome lifestyles: “Millions of people die every year of something they could cure themselves: lack of wisdom and lack of ability to control their impulses.”

Here is a link to his current portfolio (he includes a land-based driller).